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What verb do you usually use to describe the action of a "profiteer"? I know that the word "profiteer" can be used in both noun and verbal forms, but I think that the verbal form is used very rarely. This is why I opened this thread to make sure whether if I use this word in the noun form, it would sound unnatural to a native speaker because of some better alternatives or it is OK.

Examples:

1) Many food merchants were charged with profiteering in that period of time.
2) Almost all the government officials are taking advantage of people's financial problems. They are profiteering in many ways. They embezzle, take considerable amounts of money from the country's treasury, take big bank loans and do not pay them back etc.

I wonder if the above usages are correct. If they don't then what shall I use yo avoid sounding unnatural?

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Both noun and verb are possible. The verb form is common, especially in the gerund form as "profiteering", but using it as a regular verb is normal English.

The bank profiteered by offering loan at usurious rates of interest.

The noun can also be used attributively. "The profiteer businessman is only looking to get rich quick"

Note spelling "Embezzle"

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The word profiteering works well in the first sentence, but not in the second, because the officials mentioned are not making a profit, but stealing.

Almost all the government officials are taking advantage of people's financial problems. They are exploiting in many ways. They embezzle, take considerable amounts of money from the country's treasury, take big bank loans and do not pay them back etc.

The Oxford Dictionaries has

exploit
VERB

2 Make use of (a situation) in a way considered unfair or underhand.
the company was exploiting a legal loophole

2.1 Benefit unfairly from the work of (someone), typically by overworking or underpaying them.
these workers are at particular risk of being exploited in the workplace

  • Would the drive-by downvoter please care to explain why this answer isn't isn't liked? – Weather Vane May 21 at 19:19

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