2

The original sentence:

As for the unfortunate people who can command everything they want, who can gratify every caprice and lay their hands on almost every object of desire -- for them a new pleasure, a new excitement is only an additional satiation.

I would think "a new excitement" is an appositive of "a new pleasure", treat the part "As for...of desire" before the dash as an adverbial phrase for the entire sentence, and understand "for them" as another adverbial phrase for the sentence, as below:

As for them -- a new pleasure, a new excitement is only an additional satiation for them.

Does it make sense?

0

The sentence can be parsed in this way:

As for the unfortunate people who can command everything they want, who can gratify every caprice and lay their hands on almost every object of desire -- for them a new pleasure, a new excitement is only an additional satiation.

The text that has been stricken out is parenthetical nonrestrictive information. What follows the parenthetical information is not an appositive, but the continuation of the sentence that had been interrupted.

In short, in terms of the syntax, this is the essential sentence:

As for the unfortunate people who can command everything they want, a new excitement is only an additional satiation.

What comes before the comma is a dependent and introductory clause; what comes after the comma is an independent clause.

As a standalone sentence, it's a little awkward because of the use of as at the start. I suspect it would make more sense in the context of previous sentences that talk about people and new excitements in a different way. The as is probably meant to serve as a contrast to what went before.

If it were to be reversed, it would look like this:

A new excitement is only an additional satiation as for the unfortunate people who can command everything they want.

For the unfortunate people who can command everything they want is not an adverbial phrase, but a prepositional phrase.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.