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That the equipment of modern camping becomes yearly more sophisticated is an entertaining paradox for the cynic, a brighter promise for the hopeful traveler who has sworn to get away from it all.

I like to confirm that "it" refers to "the equipment", and "the cynic" and "the hopeful traveler" are the appositives in the sentence.

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  • The only appositive is the entire noun phrase that comes after the comma. May 22 '19 at 3:33
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"get away from it all" is rather an idiom which means "to escape one's everyday life, usually by taking a holiday.".

In the sentence, the improvement in modern camping equipment makes it easier/more convenient for people who wish to "escape" to somewhere else.

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  • Are you suggesting the sentence be parsed as "That the equipment of modern camping becomes yearly more sophisticated is an entertaining paradox for the cynic, [and] a brighter promise for the hopeful traveler who has sworn to get away from it all." In other words, the cynic and the hopeful traveler are two different groups of people, Sin?
    – Charlie
    May 22 '19 at 2:47
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    What I am suggesting is that "it" in the sentence does not refer to "equipment" but is rather part of an idiom. About the appositives, without context, I can't say for certain if the cynic and the hopeful traveler refer to the same or different groups of people but from the way it is written, I assume it is referring to the same person/group. May 22 '19 at 2:57

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