1

Would you tell me if the followings are the same?

Bob didn't know how to swim. However, she jumped into the pool.

Bob didn't know how to swim. Yet she jumped into the pool.

2

First, is Bob female? If not, you should use "he" instead of "she".

Now, for the question: there are a lot of ways of expressing the idea in your two sentences, and the differences are not clear, even to a native speaker of English:

  1. Bob didn't know how to swim; however, he jumped into the pool.
  2. Bob didn't know how to swim, yet he jumped into the pool.
  3. Bob didn't know how to swim, but he jumped into the pool.
  4. Bob didn't know how to swim; nonetheless, he jumped into the pool.

The usual rule on "however" is "semicolon before, comma after", by the way. Sticklers for usage don't like to start sentences with "however".

Many people would add the word "anyway" to the end of sentences 1 to 3 (both in speaking and writing) to make it clear that the action was deliberate but unexpected, but it is not strictly necessary. Sentence 4 is more formal than the others, and "anyway" would sound strange to me there.

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  • 1
    Thanks. So, but for marks, semicolons, et cetera. is there any difference between the meaning of the sentences? and is there any difference between however, nonetheless, yet and but(or even nevertheless)? – nima Apr 14 '14 at 14:49

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