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In my notebook, in the index section, there is a blank for "std."(most probably an abbreviation for "standard") alongside name blank. But, I couldn't find any dictionary defining "standard" to mean "form". So, is it a wrongful misconception of the word? Any help would be appreciated. enter image description here

  • Where did grade come from? What does that have to do with std. being in your notebook? – Jason Bassford Supports Monica May 24 '19 at 15:09
  • This really needs more context so we can understand how the abbreviation std. is being used. Why would you expect a grade to be entered into this part of the notebook? – Andrew May 24 '19 at 16:30
  • @choster As per your suggestion I've included a photograph in the question. – Kelvin May 24 '19 at 16:47
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The OED gives

standard n. 12. b. In British and Commonwealth elementary schools: Each of the recognized degrees of proficiency, as tested by examination, according to which school children may be classified. Also transf., the form or class in which pupils are prepared for a particular standard.

DH Lawrence used in a a sentence "She made friends with the Standard Three teacher" (The Rainbow, 1915), and this would make sense given your photograph. But I think it's dated usage, certainly for the United Kingdom.

I've never heard this in England, but perhaps it's still common elsewhere. We do use "Studied mathematics to A-level standard, but that's slightly different:

12 a. A definite level of excellence, attainment, wealth, or the like, or a definite degree of any quality, viewed as a prescribed object of endeavour or as the measure of what is adequate for some purpose; spec. the proper or correct quality.

  • may you please provide me with a link to that dictionary because I didn't find that definition. – Kelvin May 24 '19 at 16:00
  • The Oxford English Dictionary is at oed.com but sadly you need a login to use it. Most UK library cards will let you use it for free, perhaps you have a method from wherever you are. – jonathanjo May 24 '19 at 17:55
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I see the owner of the book is Vishal. The term 'Standard' is used in the Indian education system, in the same way as 'grade' in the US or 'year' in the UK. After nursery and kindergarten, a pupil joins the school system in the 1st Standard, at age age 5 or 6. Each year the pupil advances one Standard - to the 2nd Standard at age 7, and finally the 12th Standard at age 17. Sometimes the standards number is expressed in Roman form: I to XII.

India education system

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A grade can be well you do against a standard, but it's not the standard itself.

You can say the "grade meets the standard", and this can be possibly shortened to "his grade was standard" or "his grade was the standard."

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