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i am learning this course.

the teacher is saying

what this course is about and also what it is to be a CS230 student in fall 2018.

what does "it is to be" here mean?

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In this example,

what this course is about and also what it is to be a CS230 student in fall 2018.

The example is a sentence fragment. It is appropriate to use a fragment like this in a list of bullet points, or a brief answer to a question. Only the second part of the sentence relates to your question:

(what it is) (to be a CS230 student in fall 2018.)

You can simplify this to:

(what it is) (to be a student) (in this class).

Grammatically, you can check the meaning of this sentence by inversion:

(To be a student) (in this class) (is what)?

This question is asking what does being a student in this class mean.

  • There are many classes — so how is being a student in this class different?

  • How can we define "being a student" or "the condition of being a student" or "studenthood" in this class?

Grammatically, this might have the following answers:

(To be a student in this class) is a big time commitment. [defines how much work the students will be doing]

(To be a student in this class) is an honor. [defines something about the condition of being a student -- a simple noun]

(To be a student in this class) is to be ethical. [defines the expected character, or future behavior of the students]

(To be a student in this class) is the result of your good results on an entrance exam. [defines how the students arrived at this condition, or this class]

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