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Connect one ends of these cables to this PC and the other ends to that PC.

Is the "one ends" in the sentence above I created grammatically correct? After googled, I found this phrase is sometimes used by non-native speakers of English.

  • Why don't you make it so simple, like: Connect these cables from one end of this PC and the other from end to that PC. – I don't know who I am. May 28 at 5:02
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No, that's not syntactically / grammatically correct. 'one' is always followed by a singular noun-phrase.

Here is a comparison of "_VERB_ one ends", and "_VERB_ one end" on Google-Ngrams.

Following is an example sentence, from Cambridge dictionary, that contains one end (singular);

She tied one end of the rope to a tree.

  • Your literal statement is false. One ends a phone conversation by hanging up. In that construction, it's the plural that's always used, not the singular. You need to qualify your assertion to put it in context. – Jason Bassford May 28 at 16:46
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    That's not a plural! – user96060 May 28 at 16:55
  • @JasonBassford, in "One ends a phone conversation by hanging up.", ends is a singular verb base form and not a noun. – Zeeshan Ali May 30 at 4:18
  • @JasonBassford My statement--'one' is always followed by a singular noun-phrase.--doesn't negate the fact that 'one' can also be followed by other than noun. – Zeeshan Ali May 30 at 4:20

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