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I read a sentence in a book, Word Power Made Easy, which was:

Sometime in your dim past, you were crossed, scorned and deeply wounded by a woman (a mother, or mother figure, perhaps?). So now you have a carefully constructed defence against further hurt - you hate all women.

Does it mean that the "you" has started hating all the women including his mother just because she once scorned him. I am asking this because I don't think anybody would start hating his or her mother just because she once scorned them.

I know this is less of an English question if anything. But I'm asking this because I suspect my understanding of the text could also be wrong.

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Does it mean that the "you" has started hating all the women including his mother just because she once scorned him.

Is almost correct. You added "once": "she once scorned him". Without "once", your understanding would be very correct, because the bad things actually might have happened many times.

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  • @virolino- Remember that there is "sometime" in the starting of the sentence. So the act must have happened only once.
    – Kelvin
    May 29, 2019 at 7:06
  • You are right about the number of "required" occurrences, I updated the answer.
    – virolino
    May 29, 2019 at 7:20
  • @Kevin: "sometime" is not necessarily identical with "at one specific moment in time". It can refer to some period of time - when one action could repeat for a number of times.
    – virolino
    May 29, 2019 at 7:22

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