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I have to find error in the sentence--

The aroma of the invigorate morning cup of tea comes (1)/ wafting up the stairway and soon I am (2)/ sipping it slowly and reverentially without rushing. (3)/ No error (4)

They say there is an error in the first part but I don't think so. There is a similar sentence in oxford dictionary

‘The aroma of the fresh coffee could be smelled half way down the street, says Muriel.’

Please help me....

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    "(to) invigorate" is a verb, but it is used here as an adjective. The adjective form is invigorating.
    – TypeIA
    May 29 '19 at 8:53
  • @TypeIA This is an answer to the question. Please use the "answer" option for this, instead of commenting. May 30 '19 at 22:07
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    @RyanJensen I'm familiar with the answer button; this was indeed meant to be a passing comment (trom my smartphone) rather than a complete answer. If it does happen to be the correct and complete answer, feel free to post it. (I see that you did exactly that and I will +1)
    – TypeIA
    May 31 '19 at 8:34
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As TypeIA pointed out, the wrong form of "invigorate" is used here. Invigorate is a verb, and in this sentence it is used as if it were an adjective. Changing the word to "invigorating" gives us this sentence, which is grammatically correct:

The aroma of the invigorating morning cup of tea comes wafting up the stairway and soon I am sipping it slowly and reverentially without rushing.

It should be noted that, while this new sentence is grammatically valid, it still has what is almost certainly an error; "it," the object of "sipping" in the second clause, refers to the subject of the first clause, "aroma." It is very likely the author meant they were sipping the tea, but the sentence states that they are sipping its aroma.

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