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I was writing an answer on StackOverflow and came up with this sentence

The more buckets are allocated, the less the load factor gets. (x ?)

It sounds a bit off to me because of "the more buckets". Bucket is a countable noun, and I'm not sure if "the more" can precede it.

Apparently, I wanted to go with the "the more...the less" phrase. Specifically, I wanted to emphasise "buckets being allocated" rather than "a number of buckets specified".

I am not sure about this either...

The greater buckets are allocated, the less the load factor gets. (x)

The greater the number of buckets is, the less the load factor gets. (v ?)

The more the number of buckets is, the less the load factor gets. (x)

Please, correct me.

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  • The greater buckets are allocated:
    As a sentence it's almost valid, "The greater the buckets allocated" would work, however the meaning is different. It would mean you're using bigger buckets not more buckets. Objects of variable size can be greater and lesser, to mean bigger and smaller, but you'll rarely hear it outside specific circumstances such as "Greater London".

  • The greater the number of buckets is:
    Here you're using greater correctly for your intended meaning, the phrase is fine but it's awkward usage.

  • The more the number of buckets is:
    Nope, though you could also use higher instead of more to make this work.

Instead of more and less, numbers are usually higher and lower. There are more buckets, but the number of buckets is higher, so the only real change I'd make to your sentence is to swap less for lower as the load factor is a number.

The more buckets are allocated, the lower the load factor gets.

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