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Coordinating conjunctions (and, but, for, nor, or, so, yet) can connect main sentences, words, phrases and many others, but can they connect multiple subordinate clauses?

If yes, how should I connect them (should I add a comma and the subordinating conjunction itself or not)? Thank you.



Here are examples I made. They might be able to help when you answer my question.

1, Connect two subordinate clauses, and keep the subordinating conjunction with a comma in between.

When people tell you to settle down and stop dreaming, but when you know what you love, you should stay true to yourself and keep going.

2, Connect two subordinate clauses, and keep the subordinating conjunction but without a comma.

When people tell you to settle down and stop dreaming but when you know what you love, you should stay true to yourself and keep going.

3, Connect two subordinate clauses without a subordinating conjunction or a comma.

When people tell you to settle down and stop dreaming but you know what you love, you should stay true to yourself and keep going.

4, Last question is that: does it work if the whole sentence is in this order? or it needs some words in it to make it clear (for example, the subordinating conjunction itself?).

You should stay true to yourself and keep going when people tell you to settle down and stop dreaming but (when) you know what you love.

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    Starting the sentence with "when" and then using "but" in your examples doesn't sound write to me. It doesn't really make sense. – Jan May 30 at 15:31
  • Yes, it seems a little bit weird, or, I should say, subtle , but I think it is quite common in spoken English because I often hear them coming from other people's mouths. That confused me, so I posted this question and wanted someone to analyze whether coordinating conjunctions (FANBOYS) can connect subordinate clauses. – vincentlin May 31 at 3:08
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It's not easy to parse because it's such a long clause, but i think

When people tell you to settle down and stop dreaming but you know what you love, you should stay true to yourself and keep going.

is correct, because 'but you know what you love' needs to be included in the same subordinate clause as 'when'.

'When ..., but when...,' seems wrong to me.

You should stay true to yourself, and keep going, when people tell you to settle down, and to stop dreaming, but you know what you love.

I've broken this last example up with heavier commata to make it easier to read, but the only compulsory one is after 'going'.

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