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Which of these would be better:

I came here from England for my education

or:

I came here for my education from England

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    Why would either be wrong? You tell us. Thanks.
    – Lambie
    Commented May 30, 2019 at 23:20

1 Answer 1

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Neither of these is wrong, and the obviously intended meaning is the same. To me as a native speaker of US-English

I came here from England for my education

seems much more natural. The other sentence:

I came here for my education from England

tempts a reader to parse "my education from England" is if the education somehow came from England. A moment's thought shows this is not the intended meaning, but I think it contributes to the awkward feeling of this version.

Also, keeping the phrase "I came here from England" together as a unit simplifies the sentence and makes it feel more natural, and I think that inserting a modifier within this phrase should only be done if there is some compensating benefit, which there is not in this case.

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