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What do you call the part of a helmet that protect the eye?

enter image description here

In the picture above, there's a part that seems to have been nailed on the helmet, it's the bottom part that protects the eyes. Is there a name for it? I am thinking there might be a name, because it seems to have been added to the helmet. Because it was added, I am thinking there might be a word for it.

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    The style of fastening on that helmet is called a rivet.en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rivet I Don't think its a later addition it's similar in style to many other helmets of the era such as those found in Viking burials.
    – Sarriesfan
    Jun 1, 2019 at 22:27
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    @Sarriesfan, you mean rivets were used to affix the visor to the helmet (versus using nuts and bolts or welding). Jun 1, 2019 at 22:28
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    @ Yes JBH blackbird suggests it's nailed on but they in this case they are rivets. Nuts and bolts would leave too much of a protrusion into the wearers skull if the Helmet was struck, rivets can be quite flush. There may also have been some form of welding involved.
    – Sarriesfan
    Jun 1, 2019 at 22:34

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Visor (Definition from Merriam-Webster)

1 : the front piece of a helmet especially : a movable upper piece

2a : a projecting front on a cap or headband for shading the eyes

b : a usually movable flat sunshade attached at the top of an automobile windshield

3a : a face mask

b : disguise

enter image description here

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  • I don't think it's a moveable visor, I think it's a fixed eye guard piece a style used in Early Medieval helmets such as those used by the Saxon or Vikings.
    – Sarriesfan
    Jun 1, 2019 at 22:21
  • @Sarriesfan, the definition is a front piece of a helmet. The definition notes that it is "especially" defined as a moveable piece - but it needn't be. The fixed portion in the OP's picture is a visor. It's simply not a moveable visor. Compare to this Greek helmet which does not have a visor, just cut-outs for the eyes. Jun 1, 2019 at 22:25

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