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Shall I use:

Of the 10% that showed one or more symptoms, there are 20.25% that ..

Or,

Of the 10% that showed one or more symptoms, there is 20.25% that ..

Clearly, 10% of a countable thing (like devices) is plural. But shall I use is or are? I initially used are (the 10% consists of several items). But using grammarly, it suggests using is saying that the verb are does not seem to agree with the subject 10%.

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    Neither of your expressions sounds natural. What are the complete sentences that you have in mind? Jun 1, 2019 at 23:43

2 Answers 2

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If the 20.25% is a subset of the 10% then there are a few different ways you could express this comfortably. There is no need to include either of the wording you are asking about, but without it, I feel you may need something to break up the two percentages especially in written form.

For the purposes of my examples, 10% represents people who like ice-cream and the subset of 25.25% are adults.

  • Of the 10% that said they liked ice-cream, 20.25% were adults.
  • Of those that said they liked ice-cream, 20.25% were adults. (This assumes you have already stated the figure of 10% and there is really no need to re-state it)
  • 20.25% of those who said they liked ice-cream were adults.
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...are 20.25%...

Assuming you're talking about testing on rats or humans etc.

Of the 10% that showed one or more symptoms, there are 20.25% that went on to show upwards of 5 symptoms.

If you were saying there is a 20.25% chance that would be singular.

However, there is a 20.25% that this test was skewed.

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