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Should "from" be included or dropped in this sentence?

Hold on to the seat from behind.

Hold on to the seat behind.

Should "from" be included or dropped here? It is about a parent helping a kid to learn to ride a bike without training wheels and he/she holds on to his/her seat.

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If there were two seats, one in front and one in back, the seat in back would be "the seat behind" and someone could "hold on to the seat behind."

In your situation, where the person is standing behind the seat and holding on, they are "holding on to the seat from behind."

  • So "from" sounds natural? – It's about English Jun 2 at 6:18
  • Actually why I'm asking this because, another native said "hold it from here" sounds unnatural and said it should be "hold it here", so I was actually a bit confused because "from" can be used in this context... So do you think "hold it from here" sounds unnatural and it should be "hold it here" though it is "hold on to the seat from here" here? Why is this difference? – It's about English Jun 2 at 6:21
  • "hold it here" was used for pointing out a particular location at a device, where it should be held (not a bike seat) – It's about English Jun 2 at 6:22
  • So what do you think? – It's about English Jun 2 at 10:34

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