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Using the adjective haphazard you mean "lacking order or purpose; not planned". I need to know if the bold sentence blow makes sense in a natural way within my self-made scenario:

After graduation in pure mathematics I decided to continue my education in French literature. Now, I have a master's degree in math and another master's degree in literature. But when I turn back and look at my past years, I think I have made a big mistake. As a successful businessman today, I think all my studies have been haphazard (meaning not measured and calculated and without planning) so far while it was much better if I studied in the field of business management for instance.

If not, then please let me know what would you use instead?

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I think you used the word "haphazard" correctly, however there are a few other grammatical errors in your paragraph. I would suggest something like this:

After graduating with a degree in pure mathematics I decided to continue my education by studying French literature. Now, I have a master's degree in math and another master's degree in literature. But when I turn back and look at my past years, I think I have made a big mistake. As a successful businessman today, I think all my studies have been haphazard, it would have been much better if I had restricted my studies to business management.

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    Just one more question! "After" always succeeds by a noun. While the verb "graduate" has the noun "graduation", why have you used the gerund form within your context?
    – A-friend
    Jun 3, 2019 at 12:14
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    You could say "After graduation, I decided to ..." but adding the clause "with a degree" changes things. "After" is frequently followed by an action (present tense verb) so I don't agree with your rule.
    – Ron Jensen
    Jun 3, 2019 at 12:27
  • "After" is frequently followed by an action (with a present tense verb) that functions as a noun phrase like "graduating with a degree in pure mathematics."
    – Ron Jensen
    Jun 3, 2019 at 13:14
  • +1 for the reply @Ron Jensen. So would it be possible to say: "After graduation with a degree in pure mathematics I decided to continue..."?
    – A-friend
    Jun 3, 2019 at 13:14
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    Graduation is a noun and does not agree with with a degree in pure mathematics which is an adverbial phrase.
    – Ron Jensen
    Jun 3, 2019 at 13:18

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