0

Which choice sounds natural in the following made-up scenario?

a) Have you heard from Tom? There is no word from him recently!
b) I was at a party last night. ................................ But unfortunately we didn't come up to each other at all.

1) He was there by chance too.
2) Accidentally he was there too.

I wonder if there is a better choice in natural and idiomatic English. I have an intuition that my construction of the sentence is not valid and there is a much better way to convey the same concept.

  • 2
    I would use the word coincidentally: Coincidentally, he was there too, but, unfortunately, we didn't see each other. (I think you may want to consider amending your but... statement as it doesn't quite read right). – Bee Jun 3 at 14:54
  • No problem! Glad I could help. – Bee Jun 3 at 15:18
0

He also happened to be there, but unfortunately, we didn't bump into each other.

  • Thank you @Kaique. I've heard this usage. I think your suggested structure means the same as Bee's (Coincidentally) just your is more causal and informal. Do you agree? – A-friend Jun 4 at 12:48
  • 1
    Yes. Coincidentally is kind of a big word for me, so, I would say yes. It is more formal to say coincidentally. – Kaique Jun 4 at 13:26
0

I would use the word coincidentally:

Coincidentally, he was there too, but, unfortunately, we didn't see each other.

(I think you may want to consider amending your but... statement as it doesn't quite read right).

  • Thank you very much @Bee. But what's wrong with "we didn't come up to each other"? – A-friend Jun 3 at 15:20
  • 1
    It just doesn't sound right here, but I can't put my finger on the reason why. I think it would be technically correct. – Bee Jun 3 at 15:27
  • @A-friend may I ask why you removed my answer as the answer to your question? – Bee Jun 5 at 13:46
  • Well @Bee what Kaique says is closer to the concept that I was looking for while the adjective "coincidentally" works, but in much more formal cases. This is what I learned from Kaique. If my takeaway is incorrect, then please kindly let me know. I need to know more Bee. :) – A-friend Jun 5 at 14:12
  • I think "to come up to each other" is more like a British expression if I'm not wrong. I don't usually hear that in the US. – Kaique Jun 6 at 14:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.