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Please note that the account A is related to the account B by the same device and logged in from the same IP address.

What does the bold part mean? Does it mean that "account A and account B are logged in from the same IP address"? Or does it mean that "the same device which is logged in from the same IP address"?

Is it ok to paraphrase this sentence into "the account A is related to the account B by the same device, and these two accounts are logged in from the same IP address."?

Is this sentence grammatically correct? The bold part seems a bit odd in terms of grammar to me. Because, grammatically, the subject for "and logged in from the same IP address" is "the account A", which means that the bold part's original form should be "the account A is logged in from the same IP address", and it doesn't make sense.

  • Why would "logged in from the same IP address" not mean from the same IP address? – Jason Bassford Jun 4 at 19:52
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Yes it means a person or people using the same IP address (likely to be one person on a single computer) have logged into account A and B. It strongly suggests that the user of Account A and the user of Account B are actually the same person, and may be evidence of a "sockpuppet" account.

  • Is this sentence grammatically correct? The bold part seems a bit odd in terms of grammar to me. – jay Jun 4 at 5:45
  • You could hyphenate "logged-in". Other than that it is okay. – James K Jun 4 at 5:46
  • Then is it ok to paraphrase this sentence into "the account A is related to the account B by the same device, and these two accounts are logged in from the same IP address."? – jay Jun 4 at 5:48
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    it is the phrase "related to" that rings wrong to me. "Account A and account B are both logged in from the same IP address" would be much simpler. – George White Jun 4 at 6:10

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