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Is 'nomenclature' grammatically correct in this context?

Pseudo-code contained in the article will be presented in a programming language [name of programming language], which combines informatics and mathematical nomenclature.

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  • Grammatically, there should be a noun there, and nomenclature is a noun. So, yes, grammatically it is correct. I would worry more about whether the word fits semantically. :)
    – oerkelens
    Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 14:17
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    “Nomenclature” seems fine here, although the meaning is not very clear to me. “Contained in the article” sticks out, however. Do you mean that pseudo-codes in the article will be presented in a specific programming language? In that case, you will want to order it as I have. “Contained in the article” is too big and strange to work as an adjectival phrase. Also, you will want to use the definite article when referring to “the programming language [name]” unless you write it as “a programming language called [name]” or something like that. Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 14:38
  • Grammatically, the problems are: (1) pseudo-code shouldn't be pluralised, and (2) it should come before the [optional] clause contained in the article. Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 14:39
  • Do you mean that pseudo-codes in the article will be presented in a specific programming language? Yes. Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 15:15
  • I corrected sentence structure and now I'm wondering if it is grammatically correct? Contained pseudo-codes in the dissertation will be presented in the programming language [name of programming language], which combines informatics and mathematical nomenclature. Commented Apr 15, 2014 at 15:17

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I would agree with the use of “nomenclature”, but I'd make things more symmetric by either writing “informatical and mathematical nomenclature” or “nomenclature from (both) computer sciences and mathematics”. Unless you explicitely want to stress that “mathematical nomenclature” is one item and “informatics” is the other, which would be gramatically correct but seems a bit odd semantically, since you'd be comparing a field of science with – well – nomenclature.

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