1

I just don't understand when to use "being" in those situations? What is the logic being them?

1- An earlier draft of the law proposed in August 2011 sparked widespread criticism for allowing such detentions without families being informed.

2- An earlier draft of the law proposed in August 2011 sparked widespread criticism for allowing such detentions without families informed.

3- I've been surprised how much they can achieve without me being involved.

4- I've been surprised how much they can achieve without me involved.

5- Send the email with the file being attached.

6- Send the email with the file attached.

7- My boyfriend and I had lots of arguments as a result of me being stressed about my workload.

8- My boyfriend and I had lots of arguments as a result of me stressed about my workload.

I made out 2,4,5,8 and took the rest from the internet to understand the issue. I can give the sources: for the 7 (https://www.theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2015/jul/26/live-breathe-charity-work-but-burnout-wake-up-call), for the 3 (https://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/31/business/31corner.html) , for the 1 (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-17296145)

  • Where did you get them? 4) is odd. – Lambie Jun 5 at 16:14
  • 2
    2) is right for you two? She's obviously made them up to explore the issue... perfectly sensible approach AFAIC. – user96060 Jun 5 at 16:21
  • I don't think you make stuff up and then say: What is the logic. I think you are asked to identify incorrect or correct things. 2) and 7) are also wrong. That's true. – Lambie Jun 5 at 16:29
  • Maybe it's just me, but I'm inclined to think the present or absence of being in #3 can reflect a slight nuance of difference. The word involved is optional there anyway if we also discard being, but ignoring that I think including being slightly more carries the implication that at some earlier point I was involved (and they're doing quite well now even after I pulled out). Without being it seems to me equally likely that I was never involved in the first place. – FumbleFingers Jun 5 at 16:34
  • Sorry I made out 2,4,5,8 and took the rest from the internet. I can give the source for the 7 (theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2015/jul/26/…) – Talha Özden Jun 5 at 16:36
1

As a native American English speaker, both versions are roughly interchangeable.

However, "being + [verb]" implies to me a stronger focus on the action behind something, while words that end in "-ed" imply more of an adjective.

For 1/2, I would prefer 1 as it focuses on the action of informing families, instead of the fact that families are informed.

For 3/4, it really depends on whether or not you want to focus on the action of involving "me" or the fact that I am involved. The action implies that we should do something to ensure that "me" is involved.

For 5/6, I would prefer "with the file attached" as it more strongly implies a focus on the file itself, rather than the action of attaching the file.

For 7/8, it really depends on your own preference. I think 7 is softer as it focuses on the action of being stressed as the source of the problem, while 8 is harsher in that it basically implies that "me" is the source of the problem and "me" just happens to be stressed. However, as FumbleFingers pointed out, "as a result of my being stressed" is more common than "as a result of me being stressed" as this n-gram shows

With the grammar explanation below, you can see that present participle and past participle have very similar usages.


"Being" is an example of the present participle (typically words ending in '-ing').

The present participle is interesting as it can be used as an adjectives, verb phrases, or participle clauses.

Example as an adjective:

There was a leaking pipe.

Example as a verb phrase:

The pipe was leaking.

Example as a participle phrase:

I am next to the pipe leaking water.

Source: https://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/present_participle.htm

If you want to know more specifically about the verb tense "being": https://www.englishgrammar.org/uses-of-being/


On the other hand, the past participle are typically words that end in "-ed", "-d", "-t", "-en", or "-n".

They can similarly be used as adjectives, verb phrases, or participle clauses.

Example as an adjective:

The exhausted boy ran home.

Example as a verb phrase:

The boy was exhausted after running home

Example as a participle phrase:

The boy, exhausted from a long day at school, ran home.

Source: https://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/past_participles.htm

I hope this helps!

EDIT: Changed the numbering and added FumbleFinger's suggestion

  • I certainly don't think the examples are all "interchangeable". #5 is at the very least "dubious", but #2 and #8 are completely unacceptable so far as I'm concerned. – FumbleFingers Jun 5 at 16:46
  • I agree that #2 sounds wrong without an explanation of what the families are informed about (such as "without families informed about detentions"), but I feel that it is relatively acceptable but extremely dubious. – Jay Jun 5 at 16:50
  • I feel that #8 works because it treats "me stressed about my workload" as a single entity, which is the source of the arguments. I agree that it does sound weird, though. Similarly, #5 sounds rather odd, and I wouldn't use it myself – Jay Jun 5 at 16:51
  • @FumbleFingers what's the rule that makes 2 and 8 incorrect? To me the meaning is very clear. – pip install frisbee Jun 5 at 16:52
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    @FumbleFingers Do you mind clarifying why you consider #2 and #8 are unacceptable? I agree with you that they do sound wrong but I'm not sure why from a grammar perspective. – Jay Jun 5 at 17:31

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