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Which sentence is correct?

  1. Recently they have watched a new film and now we are expecting their mind about it.
  2. Recently they had watched a new film and now we are expecting their mind about it.
  3. Recently they watched a new film and now we are expecting their mind about it.

It seems at least 1 and 3 both are correct and mean the same thing.

And what if we replace ‘Recently’ with ‘Yesterday’? Present Perfect tense doesn’t use with ‘Yersterday’ but Past Perfect use as well.

  • Yesterday they had watched a new film and now we are expecting their mind about it.
  • Yesterday they watched a new film and now we are expecting their mind about it.
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  • 2
    I don't see a real problem with any of the tenses. However, we are expecting their mind is strange and unidiomatic. Jun 6 '19 at 10:55
  • Thanks. Is 'we expect their mind' more natural? I thought that 'had watched' is discordant with 'now' unlike 'have watched'
    – xyz
    Jun 6 '19 at 13:24
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    No. If you're going to keep mind in some form, it would be something like we are expecting they will speak their mind about it. But that's still a bit odd. You could use we are waiting (for / to hear) their thoughts, we are waiting (for / to hear) their opinion or we are waiting (for / to hear) their feedback. Jun 6 '19 at 15:33
  • But I still have doubts about sentence yesterday they had watched a film and now we are … In general, it is not appropriate to use past perfect unless the context involves two identifiable time periods in the past. Reference to the most recent uses past, reference to the other uses past perfect. For example: Past...Time A...Time B...Present. They had watched a film yesterday before 9 pm and now we are ... Here yesterday before 9 pm referring to Time B; had watched is past perfect, referring to Time A, earlier than Time B. But original sentense reffers is only past time B
    – xyz
    Jun 8 '19 at 11:25
  • There's no reason why tenses can't be combined. It just depends on how they are combined. In this case, it's fine. (As it is in many other pieces of writing.) For instance, you shouldn't say, "I went to the store before I will make dinner." It's not done because it doesn't make sense, not merely because it's mixing tenses. Jun 8 '19 at 15:24

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