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What is the meaning of language of study in the following sentence

The gist of the original sentence in the draft NEP was that students could change one of the three languages of study in Grade 6, provided that in Hindi-speaking States they continued to study Hindi, English and one other Indian language of their choice, and those in non-Hindi-speaking States would study their regional language, besides Hindi and English.

Also how can continue be used in its past participle form continued when the sentence is in imperative. It must be provided that they continue to study Hindi, English and one other Indian language of their choice.

  • It's past tense continued because the provided / if clause links back to past tense could. The Present Tense version would be Students can [do this] IF they continue to [do that]. – FumbleFingers Jun 6 at 14:50
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A language of study is a language which is used as a means of getting information at a school, university or college. It's a language of instruction. For example, if you come to school and your classes are given in English, the language of study/instruction is English.

They say "continued" because it's used after "provided (that)," which means "if." "Provided" is just more formal: The gist...was that students could change...if...they continued... . This whole sentence is in the past tense.

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Well, "A language of study" just means any type of language they are going to study. Maybe you are confusing it with "a medium of instruction" which just imply the language they are going to study in.

"Languages of study" means the language they choose to study.

And I think, because "could" has been used there before "continued" so past participle form of "continue" would have been the right choice.

  • @piyush yadav- Well, I'm a daily reader of The Hindu myself. – Kelvin Jun 6 at 9:26

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