0

"We try to give you something" or "We are trying to give you something" – which one is more idiomatic?

The lecturer is saying

so all these decisions are decisions you are going to have to do during your projects, and we try to give you here an overview of this systematic way of thinking for different projects

the antecedent is,

and the goal is to give you a systematic way to think about projects, everything related to deep learning. It includes how to collect your data, how to label your data, how to choose an architecture, but also how to design a proper loss function to optimize.

In this context, is "we are trying to give you" or "we'll try to give you" is more idiomatic than "we try to give you"?

1
  • They all seem about equally idiomatic to me, particularly in the context of a live presentation.
    – J.R.
    Jun 7 '19 at 21:40
0

I see a number of problems with the sentence:

so all these decisions are decisions you are going to have to do during your projects and we try to give you here an overview of this systematic way of thinking for different projects.

  • It feels run on to me, and should probably be split into more than one sentence.
  • In English one does not say that one is going to "do" decisions, but rather to "make" them.
  • "this systematic way of thinking " is without an antecedent in the quoted section (it isn't convenient for me to listen to the YouTube original). I can't tell, therefore, to what it referred in the longer lecture of which this is a part, and whether it worked well in context.
  • I think that "we try to give you here" is not natural. Depending on the context, "we are trying to give you" or "we will try to give you" would be better. The latter if this is an introductory statement and other parts are placed in the future, the former if the lecture is generally couched in the present.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy