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Is it right to use both 'by the then' and 'of the time' in a sentence like this:

by the then Department of General Statistics of the time

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No, it is not correct to use both, as they mean the same thing. You should use either one or the other, but not both:

... by the Department of General Statistics of the time.

... by the then Department of General Statistics.

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No, or at least I would not. It would be a redundant.

I think "of its time" would be a better choice here, but I am assuming that there is still a Department of General Statistics, but that its different now.

"the then" would be more appropriate if the Department of General Statistics no longer existed, because it had become something else. It implies that the subject being discussed is now no longer the thing it was at a prior time.

For instance, if I was discussing a politician, who was once the Director of the Department of General Statistics, but is now the Prime Minister, I might say

"Alice, the then director of the department of general statistics, used her power and influence to ensure her gradual rise through the ranks, eventually becoming Prime Minister."

I don't believe I had ever heard anyone use "the then..." except when describing a person in a role.

"...by none other than the then Head of the CIA, George H. W. bush himself." In that case, the subject is not the CIA, but the person who is the Head of it.

Hope that helps

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