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I'd like to construct this sentence, which one is a better way to put it?

I like you for who you are OR I like you as you are

What is the difference between for what something is vs as something is?

Thank you

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They'd normally be understood as meaning two slightly different things...

I like you for who you are

I like you because I like your inner qualities as a person, rather than because of "superficial" attributes (beauty, wealth, status, etc.)

I like you as you are

I don't want you to change - exactly how you are now is how I like you being

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  • for sth is : stress on the "inner essence" as it is: stress on being same? If I change the example how would the meaning change? Can we derive a general rule out of these examples? "I want you to accept it for what it is VS I want you to accept it as it is" – Ceyhun Özsoylu Jun 10 '19 at 16:18
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    They're not particularly good examples from which to derive a more general "rule" for possible differences between for and as. Better might be The policeman came to my party as a guest (how he came) and ...for a guest (why he came, perhaps to arrest one of my guests). I think that how / why distinction is essentially the same as your example. Why do I like you? Because of / for your personality / who you are. How do I like you? The way / how / as you are (currently). – FumbleFingers Jun 10 '19 at 16:42
  • nirvana had a lyrics "come as you are", how would the meaning change if he instead said: come for who you are? – Ceyhun Özsoylu Jun 16 '19 at 15:15
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    @CeyhunÖzsoylu: Come as you are is in common use (it means You don't need to make a special effort to get dressed up / put on make-up / etc.). I've never heard anyone say Come for who you are, but I can imagine I only invited you for who you are (I didn't invite you because you because you're a friend - you're only at my party because of your social status or similar). – FumbleFingers Jun 16 '19 at 16:15

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