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Good day!

How to choose a tense for the verb "be back"? By what rule?


(1) He has been busy since he has been back.

(2) He has been busy since he was back.

(3) He has been busy since he got back / returned.

They say only (2) is wrong.

How come (2) & (3) have the same tenses but (2) is wrong and (3) is right?

By what rule should we understand that (1) is right and (2) is wrong?


(4) Honey, I'm home, I'm back!

(5) Honey, I'm home, I've been back!

(6) Honey, I'm home, I've got back / 've returned!

They say only (5) is wrong.

How come (5) & (6) have the same tenses but (5) is wrong and (6) is right?

By what rule should we understand that (4) is right and (5) is wrong?


Why should "be back" and "get back" (or more formal "return") be used with different tenses in the same situations?

Thanks!


P.S.: "be back" is some strange verb. Maybe it belongs to some group where all such strange verbs are collected?

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    He's been busy since he came back. Even more tersely, He's been busy since coming back. – FumbleFingers Jun 11 '19 at 11:58
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There are two questions here. One is verb choice after (temporal) since; a punctive verb usage is usually required

(so 'since he got back / returned' is idiomatic, rather than 'since he was / is back' – although in conversation "... since he's been back ..." is almost certainly acceptable nowadays).

...............

"I've got back" is fine though informal.

"Honey, I'm home – and I've been back!" (to an understood location) is fine. But "Honey, I'm home, I've been back!" doesn't work with the intended meaning here.

"I'm back!" (though rarely "I am back!") admittedly arguably uses the be-perfect (cf "I am returned!", now 200 years out of date), but is entirely acceptable in informal registers, and is in fact the preferred form in the UK.

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  • A good explanation. What did they include the question in the list of repeated ones for ? – kngram Jul 21 '20 at 19:58
  • I'm sorry; can you explain what you're asking? What is 'the question' and what are 'the repeated ones'? – Edwin Ashworth Jul 22 '20 at 13:20
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    I asked you personally nothing. It was an approving exclamation regarding your good answer. – kngram Jul 22 '20 at 16:48

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