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Good day!

To try to better understand the Future Tenses with "will", I thought up the next situation:


Plan of a tomorrow's course:

Topic A will occupy the first 80% of the 1st lesson.

Topic B will occupy the remaining 20% of the 1st lesson.

Topic B will occupy 100% of the 2nd lesson.

Topic C will occupy 100% of the 3d lesson.

the end of the course


Examples:

(1) By the end of the 1st lesson, students will not learn topic A.

(2) By the end of the 1st lesson, students will not have learned topic A.

(3) By the end of the 1st lesson, students will not have been learning topic A.


(4) By the end of the 1st lesson, students will learn topic B.

(5) By the end of the 1st lesson, students will have learned topic B.

(6) By the end of the 1st lesson, students will have been learning topic B.


(7) By the end of the 2nd lesson, students will learn topic B.

(8) By the end of the 2nd lesson, students will have learned topic B.

(9) By the end of the 2nd lesson, students will have been learning topic B.


As I understand, we can consider "learn" from both opposite sides:

— as a process (PR) and then we can't say whether the students will already have learned the whole topic by the specified point of time or only some part of this topic;

— as a completed action (CA) and then we mean that the students will already have learned the whole topic by the specified point of time.


(1), (4) & (7):

I think all variants with Future Simple (1), (4) & (7) are correct and can mean only (PR).

Is it so?


(2) & (3):

— If we primarily consider "will not have learned topic A" in (2) and "will not have been learning topic A" in (3) as (PR), i.e. there will be "not learning topic A" at the end of the 1st lesson, then they are correct.

— If we primarily consider them as (CA), then they are incorrect.

Outcome: I don't understand how we must consider them and why this way, not that.


(5) & (6):

— If we primarily consider "will have learned topic B" in (5) and "will have been learning topic B" in (6) as (PR), i.e. there will be "learning topic B" at the end of the 1st lesson, then they are correct.

— If we primarily consider them as (CA), then they are incorrect.

Outcome: I don't understand how exactly we must consider them and why this way, not that.


(8) & (9):

— If we primarily consider "will have learned topic B" in (8) and "will have been learning topic B" in (9) as (PR), i.e. there will be "learning topic B" at the end of the 2nd lesson, then they are correct.

— If we primarily consider them as (CA), then they are correct too because at the end of the 2nd lesson the students will already know the whole topic B.

Outcome: Therefore they are both correct anyway, but for what reason exactly?


So, I really hope you will say in detail which variants are correct and why?

Thanks!

put on hold as too broad by Katy, Davo, Laure, Michael Rybkin, Lambie 5 hours ago

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Non of 1, 2, or 3 are correct and they all imply that topic A has not been [fully] covered. Whereas, in truth, all of Topic A has been completed. Consider removing the "not". – Bee Jun 17 at 10:02
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Your question seems overly complicated. I think we can pare this down to one example, as the other two are duplicates.

You seem to be confused whether is is appropriate to use the progressive "learning", particularly in the future case. The answer is, yes you can.

Simple future:

Today the students will learn Lesson 1

Today the students will be learning Lesson 1.

Future perfect:

By the end of the day, students will have learned Lesson 1

By the end of the day, students will have been learning Lesson 1.

Only the last sentence is a little awkward, since the progressive tense describes an ongoing process and "by the end of the day" is a specific moment in time that suggests the action will be complete by then. It makes more sense to relate the process to another event:

Students will have been learning Lesson 1 as we introduce Lessons 2 and 3.

or to describe a future projection

By the end of the day, students will have been learning Lesson 1 for five or six hours.

Still, there's rarely a good reason to use the future perfect progressive. Most of the time, simpler is better:

Students will still be learning Lesson 1 as we introduce Lessons 2 and 3.

Also, if you really want to emphasize the process of "learning", it may be better to use a different verb:

By the end of the day, students will have been practicing Lesson 1 for five or six hours.

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