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I found this sentence in a book, but I don’t understand what it means. The author is a personal coach and is talking about her work with a client:

A woman I worked with described herself as ‘not a feelings person’ and was convinced there was nothing I could do to help her change this. She was a manager at a restaurant and she had a reputation for giving brutal feedback without realising the impact it had. Thus, she didn’t have the best working relationships she could. I explained: ‘You can’t think yourself into feeling any more than you can feel yourself into thinking.’ She looked nonplussed and a bit cross at this, so we started with me helping her with some of the emails she had to write to restaurant staff she had difficult relationships with. I advised her to replace half the ‘I think’ sentences with ‘I feel’.

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You can’t think yourself into feeling any more than you can feel yourself into thinking

To think yourself into feeling would be to use intellectual effort into having an emotional response

To feel yourself into thinking is the opposite, to use emotional effort to get an intellectual response

The author is saying you can't do either.

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