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Suppose a mother takes her kid to a park. Mother lets her child go and play and the child gets the playing started. The mother begins reading newspaper for a couple of minutes. The mother turns her head and sees that her child is playing in a dusty place and getting soiled.

Soil as a noun means:

  • The material on the surface of the ground in which plants grow.

And

Soil as a verb means:

  • To make something dirty, especially with solid waste: soiled nappies/underwear/sheets.

What should the mother tell her kid?

  1. Get out of there; you're soiling yourself/your clothes.
  2. Get out of there; you're making yourself/your clothes soiled.
  3. Get out of there; you're making yourself/your clothes dusty

Or

  1. Get out of there; you're getting soiled.
  2. Get out of there; you're getting dusty.
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Getting dirty would be a best choice, since soiling yourself in this case would mean, that the baby pooped itself. And dusty is more about being covered by dust from air, not dirt from the ground.

| improve this answer | |
  • +1 . Well; therefore, the mother can say: "get out of there; you're getting yourself/your clothes dirty." Or "get out of there; you're getting dirty." Right? :) – A-friend Jun 19 '19 at 10:17
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    Right. That would be correct. – TK-421 Jun 19 '19 at 10:17

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