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You will receive early access to upcoming product features and releases for beta testing.

This sentence is from an email, and "for beta testing" is confusing. Does this sentence mean:

... (upcoming product features for beta testing) and (releases for beta testing)

or

...(upcoming product features and releases) for (beta testing).

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It is the second one. Features and releases are both things that a beta tester would need. The first sentence you have is also correct though. It just adds more words because yes, the features are for testing and the releases are also for testing.

  • I don't think this is right. The entire purpose of "beta testers" is to test "beta releases". But anybody might be interested in knowing what "upcoming product features" a development team is assessing and/or developing, even if they're not willing to sign up as a beta tester (of a beta release which may not yet support certain upcoming features that users are really interested in). Those features are to whet your appetite, not necessarily to be tested. – FumbleFingers Jun 19 at 16:02
  • No, this is correct because if the release is upcoming and you get early access to the features then it is a beta feature. – Gerold Astor Jun 19 at 16:22
  • Nah. According to your (non-native Anglophone?) interpretation, the cited text is notionally a shortening of You will receive early access to upcoming product features for beta testing. You will also receive early access to upcoming releases for beta testing, which seems semantically problematic to me. My reading is You will receive early access to upcoming product features. You will also receive [beta] releases for beta testing, which makes more sense to me. But the difference is so tiny it barely means anything except as an exercise in parsing. – FumbleFingers Jun 19 at 16:57
  • The argument in these comments is relatively pointless. Beta releases include beta features. You can't have a release without any features. Nor can you test a feature absent the deployment mechanism of some kind of release. Both are tested, and they are mostly inextricably linked. You can read about features without any context, but you can't test them without any context. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jun 19 at 18:38

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