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Is it "mobilized to X" or "mobilized into X"? I am not sure what's the correct idiomatic use of the verb mobilized. I think it's the former, but I am thinking it might actually be wrong, so I am wondering what's the correct way of using it.

For example:

The military command mobilized the amphibian unit to sea in order to attack the enemy by sea.

  • To (or at) would be used if talking about a location, and Into if talking about a particular shape or configuration. (In other words, into a fighting unit or into an X type of formation. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jun 21 '19 at 13:40
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Mobilized is not the same as moved, even if they sound similar. One just mobilizes something, not "to", not "into".

Therefore I would rewrite your sentence:

The military command mobilized the amphibian unit to the sea in order to attack the enemy by sea.

In this way, I also got rid of the ugly repetition of "sea".

Getting rid of the repetition by un-using the other "sea" makes the sentence just awkward:

The military command mobilized the amphibian unit to the sea in order to attack the enemy by sea.

  • What about: "The military command will mobilize the amphibian unit to sea when the situation requires it."? – blackbird Jun 20 '19 at 10:44
  • According to the dictionaries, mobilize = prepare. Since you cannot really "prepare to sea", "mobilize to sea" is also not OK, from my POV. However, I am not a typical user of this word / these sentences, so somebody more knowledgeable might want to clarify some things for us. – virolino Jun 20 '19 at 10:49
  • +1 Mobilise (Uk english spelling) is more like activating something - changing it's state from standby into action. You could mobilise the amphibian unit and send it to sea, but it may be obvious it's going to sea as it's an amphibian unit. I am wondering though whether you could mobilise the 3rd regiment to Afghanistan though. – Smock Jun 20 '19 at 11:15

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