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"Okay, I am gonna look around, take a few statements."

Hi, I saw this line in a tv-series. Is it correct as is? I think using comma here is wrong? There was a one-and-a-half second pause between "look around" and "take". Subtitle was as I quoted. I would use "and" here instead of "pause" in speaking .

Is "pause" considered as "and" in speaking?

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    It's very common in relaxed spoken English to simply discard the word and entirely. And that doesn't mean it needs to be "replaced" by either a pause in speech or a comma in the written form. You'll never hear a pause or see a comma in coarsely dismissive Why don't you go f__k yourself!, but you'll certainly hear ...go and f__k yourself (where and is often only partially enunciated, but is definitely present and intended). In your example, a pause could be seen as representing unspoken but implied repetition of I'm gonna. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jun 21 '19 at 17:17
  • @FumbleFingers Hi, I saw this sentence in a book "The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory, groaned as if it would deny what had happened." Don't we need to use "and" here before "groaned" instead of the comma? – Talha Özden Jun 29 '19 at 14:11
  • Obviously we don't need and there, or the writer would have included it! Seriously, that text is in "mock-archaic poetic / hifalutin" style, where it's also common to discard and when fusing two statements into one like this. But think my go f__k yourself! example above might not be very helpful here, because that would never include a pause. But for the kind of contexts you're thinking of (with a "reduced" second statement because the subject isn't repeated), I think there's always a pause if the two statements aren't explicitly joined by and. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jun 29 '19 at 16:04
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Well for a start it’s direct speech, so pretty much anything goes. But even given that, I’d say it’s perfectly fine. You could view it as a prematurely terminated list, where it’s being suggested that the speaker was planning to describe a four-item list:

Okay, I am gonna look around, take a few statements, worry a few suspects and generally put the fear of God into them, and then go home and take a nap.

but for whatever reason stopped after item two.

Of course that’s just a roughly concocted example. I mean, even with that underlying context perhaps it could still be faulted because it ended with a period, whereas an ellipsis would probably be a better choice:

Okay, I am gonna look around, take a few statements,…

But I reckon that’s too fine a point to care about. For me, the thing is fine as it is.

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  • Hi, I saw this sentence in a book "The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory, groaned as if it would deny what had happened." Don't we need to use "and" here before "groaned" instead of the comma? – Talha Özden Jun 29 '19 at 14:12
  • In general, yes you are right. But in this case, removing the comma creates ambiguity. In the original form it is clear that the palace is the thing that does both the shaking and the groaning. The earth merely rumbles. But without the comma (assuming we insert the "and", as you suggest), then although we could still interpret it that original way, the more common reading (because of the word order) would be that the palace merely shakes, and it is the earth that both rumbles and groans. Clarity beats rules and so in this case I would leave that comma in, as well as having the "and". – tkp Jul 6 '19 at 19:00
  • Thank you. So your version would be like this: "The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory, and groaned as if it would deny what had happened." – Talha Özden Jul 6 '19 at 19:07
  • Yes, exactly. Just FYI, another option for situations like this, where each item in the list is quite long, is to use a semicolon, rather than a comma, as the list separator. That is especially useful if a comma is need within a list item itself. So you might have: "The palace still shook occasionally as the earth rumbled in memory; rattled, especially in the winter when the wooden window and door frames tended to shrink; and groaned as if it would deny what had happened." – tkp Jul 6 '19 at 19:30

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