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The adjective oblivious is used with preposition of/to, but in the following sentence I don't understand its usage.

Oblivious that an unconscious patient was still lying alone on a bed, staff of a State-run community healthcare centre in Uttar Pradesh’s Muzaffarnagar district allegedly shut its gates and left as their duty hours were over.

Also can still be used for past reference as used above?

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If you understand obvious of and oblivious to, then you can consider the sentence to be an elided form of one of those:

Oblivious [to the fact] that an unconscious patient was still lying alone on a bed . . .


The sentence would mean essentially the same thing without still, but it's being used to emphasize the fact that the man continued to lie on the bed (I assume unattended to and neglected) when the staff left.

Still is used as an adverb to modify lying, and lying is without a specific tense. It's the use of was in was still lying that puts it all in the past. Still has no bearing on that tense.

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