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1- I was walking home from the coffe shop. I have a job bussing tables there.

What does the marked phrase mean? I look it up in a dictionary and it says that "a job doing something" means "to have difficulties doing something". But ıt doesn't work here I think.

Extra question : About use of participle in those sentences.

2- I work at the coffee shop bussing tables.

I think the second one okay to me. My interperation is something like that for the use of participle:

Bussing tables is part of working at the coffe shop.". In the process of working at the coffe shop, I am bussing the tables.

But I can't understand the use of the participle in the first sentence. ( I have a job bussing tables there.)

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the phrase "have a job" can carry any of several meanings. Here it means "I work at the coffee shop bussing tables". (In case you are not familiar with this use of "bussing", it means "clearing tables of used dishes, and setting the tables up ready for the next customer"

She needs to organize the project. She will have quite a job doing that.

means that she has a hard task ahead. These two meanings require context to determine which applies in a particular case.

Most often "I have a job doing X" or "he has a job doing X" indicates employment, while "I will have a job doing Y" suggests a difficult task, although it may mean future employment. Versions such as 'quite a job" or 'a tough job" or "one heck of a job" all tend to mean the difficult task. Context is important in each case.

  • Using participle here kind of confused me. I guessed the meaning though. :( . Work somewhere doing something. – Talha Özden Jun 22 at 15:39
  • @Talha Özden which participle and how did it confuse you please? Also "Using a participle" would be more correct than "Using participle" . – David Siegel Jun 22 at 15:46
  • Thanks. "I work at the coffee shop bussing tables". "I have a job bussing tables there." . I think the first one okay to me. Bussing tables is part of working at the coffe shop.". My interperation is something like that: In the process of working at the coffe shop, I am bussing the tables. But the second participle still seems awkward to me. "Have a job bussing tables." – Talha Özden Jun 22 at 15:51
  • @Talha Özden "I have a job bussing tables" is a common usage. Many restaurants employ people whose primary job is to buss tables -- I held such a job in the 1980s. The traditional term for such an employee is "busboy", a term now less common than it once was. Worst job in then place too, and the lowest paid. – David Siegel Jun 22 at 16:59
  • Thank you for clarification :) But that wasn't my question. I marked the participles in those sentences. Those are my problems. :) – Talha Özden Jun 22 at 17:20

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