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A person spent $190.Everyone got a coupon by spending $50. So a person could get another coupon if he had spent $10 more. The conversation between the customer and the shopkeeper went this way:

Shopkeeper: Sorry Sir, you could get another coupon if you had spent $10 more.

Person: But I spent only $10 less.

Is the use of "less" And "more" natural? And in these sentences can "dollars" be dropped? Like:

You could get another coupon if you had spent 10 more.

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First, as was pointed out in a comment, few if any places issue coupons for shopping. They issue coupons for buying.

Second, "more" and "less" are equally acceptable words.

Finally, the $ signs in your written examples correspond to the spoken word "dollars." It is not idiomatic to drop the word that describes what a number refers to unless the referent is completely clear from context. If you are in any doubt whatsoever, specify the referent of the number. In your example, how is anyone to know whether you are talking about dollars, cents, or items if you do not bother to say?

  • So will it sound idiomatic if I use: "I spent on $10 less".? – It's about English Jun 24 at 16:59
  • The "on" is not idiomatic. Perhaps you meant to say "only 10 dollars less." That is idiomatic. – Jeff Morrow Jun 24 at 17:06
  • Yup... A typo.... Again... :( – It's about English Jun 24 at 17:51

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