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Considerable improvement in the treatment of HIV has also decreased premature deaths for black men, who were hammered by the epidemic. An estimated 42% of the 1.1m Americans living with HIV today are black, triple their share of the population. At the peak of the epidemic, around 1994, the virus was killing blacks at an age-adjusted rate of nearly 60 per 100,000-or three times the rate at which opioid overdoses killed whites in 2017.

Is the subject of "triple their share of the population" black people? and 42% is the result of being "tripled"? and what does "the population" in their share of the population refer to? Is it Americans as a whole?

Can anyone help me with this sentence?

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The subject is "An estimated 42%" which is triple the share of the American population (i.e., the percentage of the population) that is black. Share means percentage.

The percentage of the American population that is black is 14%, but the percentage of Americans living with HIV who are black is triple that at 42%. The concept overall is that black Americans are disproportionately overrepresented in the HIV population.

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  • How can black living with HIV(42) be bigger than whole black people in America(14%)?? – dbwlsld Jun 25 '19 at 5:52
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    @dbwlsld It's the black percentage of the American HIV population (42% of 1.1 million) compared to the black percentage of the American population (14% of 300 million, or whatever the total American population is at the moment). – Katy Jun 25 '19 at 5:59
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    @dbwlsld This says that 14% of people living in America are black (roughly 3 out of 20 people). But 41% of people living in America with AIDS are black (roughly 8 out of 20 people). There is more to the AIDS statistic than you would expect from just a proportional representation (3 out of 20) of citizenship. Everything being equal, the proportions should be the same—but they aren't. – Jason Bassford Jun 25 '19 at 15:43

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