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If I want to say something like:

They arrived early so that:

1) their friends could find them easily, and

2) there were enough good seats to choose.

How can I put them into a sentence without the "1)" and "2)"? I think it is something like

They arrived early so that their friends could find them easily and so that there were enough good seats to choose.

But should I say "so that ... and so that ...", or "so that ..., and that", or "so that ... and ..."?

1 Answer 1

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First, you have to use the conditional after "so that," so it should be "so that they wouldn't miss anything."

The best way to say this is:

They arrived early so that they wouldn't miss anything and could find good seats.

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  • Thanks for the suggestion. Actually, I am more interested in whether a second "so that" is required; and if it is required, what would be the correct way to use it? My example is not good enough, so I will edit it and use a different example with different subjects after "so that". Commented Jun 27, 2019 at 3:43
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    I wouldn't repeat "so that" if you can avoid it - it sounds too repetitive. Instead you can make a parallel structure starting from any word after the "so that."
    – Ethan B.
    Commented Jun 27, 2019 at 3:48
  • I see. Thank you so much. My original sentence is much longer so I made up this shorter one just trying to figure out the correct grammar. It would be much better if I can omit the second "so that" even just for brevity. Commented Jun 27, 2019 at 3:53
  • Yeah, I would just get rid of the second "so that" in the new sentence. Although now it does sound a bit awkward either way. In general, the longer the parallel parts before and after the "and," the more awkward it will sound.
    – Ethan B.
    Commented Jun 27, 2019 at 3:56
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    Exactly! I feel that my original sentence is awkward because the parallel parts are much longer. I thought it was my grammar issue. So probably I should rephrase it in another way to improve it. Commented Jun 27, 2019 at 4:03

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