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If a woman say:

Please, don't take me for a woman who's stuck in the past.

You understand that she is asking you not to see her as a woman who is stuck in the past or that she is asking you not to let her in the hands (sorry, I couldn't find a better expression to use here) of a woman who is stuck in the past.

I'm asking that because the word "for" has two different translations in Portuguese and, depending on which one you choose, the phrase gets two completely different meanings.

Also, could I omit the word "who's" and simply write "Please, don't take me for a woman stuck in the past"?

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You have to consider "take for" as a complete phrasal verb, meaning "to believe something, usually wrongly, about someone or something".

She looks so young I took her for your sister.

Do you take me for a complete idiot?

Take for

You can certainly omit "who's" in your example sentence. Don't take me for a woman stuck in the past. There is no change in meaning, and there is definitely no suggestion that you are "going to say more".

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The actual main verb of the sentence is an imperative, which is in the second person.

Effectively, the sentence reads:

Please, don't you take me for a woman who's stuck in the past.

The only part of the sentence that determines this is please, don't. The rest of the sentence is just information in addition to that.

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