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How do you say "Game of Thrones-themed" idiomatically? I can think of multiple ways of saying it, but I have no idea what is the right way. Is there a correct format for this? It's easy when the title is in one word like Godzilla, but otherwise it's hard. I can think of two ways.

For example:

It's a Game of Thrones-themed sandal.

It's a Game of Thrones themed sandal.

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I wouldn't say that there is any "correct" way to do this. There is only how people choose to write it. So if half of the examples use a hyphen:

A Star Wars-themed lunchbox

and the other half don't:

A Star Wars themed lunchbox

then both are equally "correct". Alternately, you can put quotes around longer proper names to ensure the reader understands everything within the quotes is part of the name:

An "Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension"-themed screen saver.

or italics, if the format allows it:

An Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind-themed coffee mug.

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When using an open noun as part of a compound adjective, and where you don't want to add hyphens between any of the phrase's components, there are several possibilities, which aren't necessarily mutually exclusive.

  1. You present the open phrase in a way that's stylistically different way than the rest of the text (note that TV shows are normally in italics anyway; I will be following that convention with the remaining examples):

      It's a Game of Thrones-themed show.
      It's a "Game of Thrones"-themed show.      

  1. You use an en dash rather than a hyphen—which many style guides, including The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed., 6.80), recommend:

      It's a Game of Thrones–themed show.

  1. You don't use hyphenation at all; it's just a convention, and one that's not applied the same way universally (especially in this case, with the TV show's name in italics, the meaning is clear without hyphenation):

      It's a Game of Thrones themed show.

  1. You simply rephrase the sentence to avoid the issue:

      It's a show with a Game of Thrones theme.

So, there are many different possibilities. There is no universally correct way of doing this.

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