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Is it okay to use:

Why is she sleeping so late? (Does this mean: "Why is she still sleeping?")

To mean: >Why is she still sleeping?

It is afternoon, so a person wants to ask:

Why is she sleeping in the afternoon?

(Does this sound okay to mean "why is she still sleeping"?)

Do the two sentences (the ones in the yellow boxes sound natural?)

And what will a person exclaim:

I slept late at night so I ended up sleeping late. (I.e. I woke up late.)

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2 Answers 2

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The first two are ok, although it might sound more natural with "asleep" instead of "sleeping".

The last sentence would be better rewritten as "I fell asleep late so I ended up waking up late" or "I went to bed late so I ended up sleeping in"

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  • So is it okay to use "Why is she asleep so late? " To mean "Why is she still sleeping"? Commented Jun 29, 2019 at 4:22
  • "Why is she sleeping so late? " Will it sounds like she is actually sleeping so late like 1 am etc? " Commented Jun 29, 2019 at 4:26
  • You can't use "sleeping" to mean "going to sleep." So sleeping late would be like staying asleep at 10 am, not going to sleep at 1 am.
    – Ethan B.
    Commented Jun 30, 2019 at 3:19
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Based on context, Why is she sleeping so late? and Why is she still sleeping? can mean completely different things.

For example:

  • It's 5:00 a.m.
  • I go into the bedroom where she's sleeping.
  • I start banging pots and pans loudly in front of her ears, but she remains asleep.

There is only one sentence that applies:

✔ Why is she still sleeping?
✘ Why is she sleeping so late?

They can imply the same thing, but the syntax on its own does not.

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