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The sentence I am writing looks like this:

In collaboration with X and Y, [I/we] developed a method for ... [I/We] showed that the method works well in situation Z.

I would say that the first occurence should be "I", and the second "We", but it feels a bit weird.

EDIT: just to clarify, what I mean is that the method was developed by X, Y and me, and that the three of us showed that the method works well.

  • There is no rule. It depends entirely on context and what you're trying to express. Who developed it? Are X and Y different from the people included in we in the first sentence? (In collaboration with [Jim and Sarah], we [Tom, Mary, and I] developed a method for . . .) Who showed that it worked well? Just you or all of you? – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jun 30 '19 at 16:32
  • Yes, sorry, my question was unclear. In both cases, 'we' is 'Me + X + Y'. – Rastapopoulos Jun 30 '19 at 16:44
  • It is better to say: X, Y and I developed a method for x. – Lambie Jun 30 '19 at 17:42
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Grammatically, you are correct.

In collaboration with X and Y, I developed a method for ... We showed that the method works well in situation Z.

However, this sounds like "I" was the principle researcher and did most of the work while X and Y only helped. If credit is to be shared equally, X and Y should be in the main sentence and not in a dependent clause.

X, Y and I developed a method for ...

  • Thanks, I agree. The thing is that I'm writing this sentence for a job applicaition, though, and saying 'X, Y and I developed ...' sounds a bit strange too in that context. – Rastapopoulos Jun 30 '19 at 20:22

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