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There is less need for a superstar hardware designer hanging around.

Can someone diagram this sentence for me? I remember that "-ing" form as present participle can represent an event that is progressing (e.g., Being given a chance, she immediately jumped at it); or has finished(?); or will happen(I'm leaving tomorrow, of cause in different context.

Sometimes it can represent passive voice, e.g. need doing something.

Could explain it to me that how "-ing" can be used in three different context showing above?

By the way, English is really a complex language.

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  • It's a bit of a bodge. I think it is an attempt at a passive, badly rendered. There is less need for [having] a superstar hardware designer hanging around. Or there is less need for a superstar hardware designer [to be] hanging around. There are dialects that tend to drop that to be after need and want. This may be what you've run into.
    – Phil Sweet
    Jun 30, 2019 at 17:46
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    Actually, it would require a superstar software designer to diagram it.
    – Hot Licks
    Jun 30, 2019 at 18:28
  • Ive's departure may not hurt too much because Apple's hardware division isn't going to be the only thing the company is focusing on in future. The smartphone and tablet markets won't see the sort of explosive growth that they have done in the past. And, as the company pushes into services as a key vehicle for profit, there's less need for a superstar hardware designer hanging around.
    – momsta
    Jun 30, 2019 at 18:51
  • I consider structure "for sb doing sth" here used as adverbial phrase of purpose or adjective phrase.
    – momsta
    Jun 30, 2019 at 19:14

1 Answer 1

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“(There is) [now] (less need) for a (superstar hardware designer) [to be] (hanging around)”.

To "hang around" is to wait, doing nothing in particular, until something happens.

In this case, there is no specific time at which the "hanging around" is happening. It could be now, or in the future. The sentence is saying that the "hanging around" is not necessary any more.

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