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In the following sentence

Mr. Gandhi’s letter of resignation is part self-reflection, about the Congress in general and his own personal role in it, and part a critique of the state of affairs of Indian politics.

Though I am able to comprehend this sentence but never saw such use of part

Is it grammatical?

  • This is a very common pattern in literary English, but the only dictionary I have found which even mentions it is in the OED, the single sentence "it is frequently used more than once in a sentence, forming a kind of correlative construction".. – Colin Fine Apr 15 at 8:57
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If you try using the term one half instead you can see the meaning is the same. It is making a partition of the letter into its two goals. Describing a thing as part this and part that is typical English.

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The “part X, part Y” means that the letter can be divided into a part that contains X and a part that contains Y.

You see a similar construction in some recipes. For instance, a drink may be [made by combining] one part X and two parts Y. When there are numbers, they give a specific ratio of the listed ingredients. When there aren’t numbers, the ratio is unspecified.

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