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The train has been cancelled.

The train is cancelled.

The train has cancelled.

Which one is the correct sentence ?

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When a train is cancelled, it is an occurrance that extends from that moment forward, since trains aren't "uncancelled", though they could be "postponed". So this one is OK:

The Train has been cancelled.

However,

The Train is cancelled.

does not work logically in this context. I can't say its specifically wrong because the train is cancelled, but I don't think anyone would say it this way.

And when you say:

The Train has cancelled.

this cannot stand by itself since this form requires a direct object, like:

The snow has cancelled my travel plans.

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The Train has been cancelled.

You would hear this when the speaker is formally communicating that the particular train service has been cancelled.

The Train is cancelled.

This is a casual expression of the same thing and is more frequently used in close proximity, either time or physically.

The Train has cancelled.

I cannot think of a reasonable scenario where this would be used.

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The Train has been cancelled. This is correct; you are using the past perfect tense. This tense indicates that an action was completed (finished or "perfected") at some point in the past before something else happened

The Train is cancelled. This is correct; you are using the past participle to describe the train. You can use this phrase in a more informal way and to describe what is happening right now or very recently; the train is cancelled means that the train has literally just been cancelled as we are speaking.

The Train has cancelled. This sentence is not grammatically correct.

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The Train has been cancelled. - YES

The Train is cancelled. - NO

The Train has cancelled. - NO

Use the first one. It is grammatically correct and it sounds very fluent.

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The train has cancelled doesn't make sense but cancel is transitive verb and will use object.and also train by itself can't anything.

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