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1- l'll get engaged like all the others. Get married. Maybe it's better doing things the way everyone does. (original)

2- l'll get engaged like all the others. Get married. Maybe it's better to do things the way everyone does.

3- It’s always better being safe than sorry.

4- It’s always better to be safe than sorry. (original)

5- Wouldn't it be better putting a time-limit on the task? (original)

6- Wouldn't it be better to put a time-limit on the task?

7- You are better eating just a small snack than hurrying a main meal. (original)

8- You are better to eat just a small snack than hurry a main meal.

Is there a difference in meaning between these versions?

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There are two idiomatic constructions here:

"It is better" + infinitive, e.g.

It is better to be safe than sorry.

"You are better off" + present participle, e.g.

You are better off eating just a small snack than hurrying a main meal.

(And you can substitute any other personal pronoun in the second form - I, he, she, we, etc.)

So sentences 1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 are ungrammatical.

  • I quoted some of the sentences from here: (collinsdictionary.com/amp/english/…) – Talha Özden Jul 6 at 7:00
  • Huh. All I know is, those examples don't sound natural to me. Maybe in another dialect they would be more common. But I guess another thing to keep in mind is, just because it's in a dictionary doesn't mean that people commonly use it. – Ethan B. Jul 6 at 17:28

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