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Is "synchronize X with someone" idiomatic? I am not sure how idiomatic it is, because this phrase is not seen often, but I feel it might be possibly correct, because semantically it seems to be correct.

For example:

You were trying to synchronize your jumps with your wife during the race.

Saying wife's instead of wife looks weird. Am I wrong to say that?

  • 2
    Do you mean your jumps with your wife's? – Jason Bassford Jul 5 at 22:35
  • Is there a better way to say it? – blackbird Jul 5 at 22:57
  • What do you mean by jumps – Kaique Jul 6 at 0:16
  • jump as in jumping – blackbird Jul 6 at 0:23
  • @blackbird Synchronizing your jumps with your wife doesn't make any sense. What exactly do you mean by that? If you change it to wife's, then your jumps are synchronized with her jumps. But if it's not her jumps that you synchronize with, what is it? It might also work if you remove your, and just say you are trying to synchronize jumps with your wife. In that form, it's clear that it's your jumps and your wife's jumps that are being synchronized—even if it's not clearly spelled out. – Jason Bassford Jul 6 at 2:42
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Choices are:

  1. You were trying to synchronize your jumps with your wife's jumps during the race.

or

  1. You were trying to synchronize your jumps with your wife's during the race.

or

  1. You were trying to synchronize jumps with your wife during the race.

regarding:

Saying wife's instead of wife looks weird. Am I wrong to say that?

Saying "wife's" is case #2, where you are implying the word "jumps", but omitting it. This usage is not weird. If you prefer to say "wife", then case #3.

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