0

If someone had double parked his car behind another car, what's a natural phrase to be used:

How am I supposed to get out? (of the parking spot)

How am I supposed to reverse out?(of the parking spot)

How am I supposed to back out? (of the parking spot)

The person whose exit was blocked says this. Do the three sentences above sound natural?

There are two cars flanking the parked car and there is a curb in front of it. And then another car comes and parks behind that car, thus blocking it in.

  • "Double-parking" refers to the vehicle that is parked in the traffic lane, not the vehicle that is parked in the parking lane. Unless there is another stopped (or parked) vehicle ahead of the "double-parked" car, the "double-parked" car should be able to move forward when it unparks itself. – Jasper Jul 6 at 12:29
  • Like there is a curb ahead and two cars flank it and then another car comes and parks behind it, thus blocking it in... @Jasper – It's about English Jul 6 at 13:01
1

I agree with Jasper that the common use of double-park is more like this.

In the situation you describe we would say

Someone has parked behind me.

The common response would be:

I can't get out

I can't back out

"Reverse out" works, although to my American ears it sounds like it's from another English dialect, or from a non-native speaker.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.