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Is "turns into X until" idiomatically and semantically correct? I often hear the phrase "turns into X until", but it doesn't seem to be correct. Instead of that, it should be "turns into X and remains X until", but is this really the case, because I never hear people use the former.

For example:

He turned into a dog until he wagged his tail (became human again by wagging his tail).

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Agreed. To be very logically consistent, it should be:

He turned into a dog, and remained that way, until he wagged his tail (became human again by wagging his tail).

The original sentence's meaning is clear though. In the context of a fast-paced game or movie where everyone understands what's going on, the original usage of the sentence might be acceptable. In casual informal speech you can get away with logical errors sometimes.

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  • Hmm, yeah, never understood why people talked like that though.
    – Sayaman
    Jul 6, 2019 at 15:19

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