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the comparative degree of bluff (having a open way of talking) is more bluff, Why?
As a monosyllable, maybe it should be bluffer?

  • Why not consult a dictionary? The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language has this: bluff adj. bluff·er, bluff·est. – Lucian Sava Jul 6 '19 at 21:40
  • Merriam Webster's advanced learner's dictionary has this: bluff adj [more -, most - ] – momsta Jul 7 '19 at 3:32
  • In AmE, I have never heard or used Bluff as you are using it. Frank is quite similar and will be better understood in AmE. – EllieK Sep 14 '20 at 14:18
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Why not consult a dictionary? The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language has this: bluff adj. bluff·er, bluff·est. – Lucian Sava. Merriam Webster's advanced learner's dictionary has this: bluff adj [more -, most - ] – momsta

So both "more bluff" and "bluffer" are possible.

But it is quite rare as an adjective, and I'd probably try to avoid the comparative if possible, not least because "bluffer" could be confused with the agent noun "a person who bluffs"

  • I agree with the advice to avoid this usage. That meaning of "bluff" is a distant third when I think of the word "bluff", behind "an attempt to deceive someone into believing that one can or will do something" and "a high steep bank" – Kevin Sep 14 '20 at 17:45

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