0

Tell me please which sentence is correct.

The part where he is saying it is at 4 minute and 45 second.

The part where he is saying it is at 4 minutes and 45 seconds.

Or is this one better?

The part where he is saying it is at the 4th minute and 45th second.

  • 1
    The second version is best, although "and" can be omitted. – Weather Vane Jul 8 at 19:47
  • 1
    If you're referring to a time in a video or audio recording, we also say "... at four minutes forty five" or if it's clear you're not talking about the time of day, you'll also hear "... at four forty-five" – jonathanjo Jul 8 at 20:00
  • @jonathanjo I have never said that. I have always said at four minutes and forty-five seconds. I will leave out the extra words only in response to What's the time? – Jason Bassford Jul 8 at 20:24
  • @JasonBassford In commentary about films and certainly in audio and video editing studios I've certainly heard reduced like this very frequently. Of course in general speech it tends to be longer, especially if there's any potential people are talking about the time of day. – jonathanjo Jul 8 at 21:51
0

Of the choices in the question, I think the second:

The part where he is saying it is at 4 minutes and 45 seconds.

is most natural. But I often hear or read this sort of thing, particularly in indicating a position in online videos, in shortened form:

  • The part where he is saying it is at 4 minutes, 45 seconds.
  • The part where he is saying it is at the 4:45 mark.
  • The part where he is saying it is at 4:45.

If using the longer, fuller form, minutes and seconds must be in plural form, and the ordinal form (4th minute) is not used.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.